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Ace Basin NERR Monitoring Program

Sponsoring Organization:  NOAA National Estuarine Research Reserve System (NERRS)

Description:  The ACE Basin NERR, designated in 1992, consists of about 140,000 acres and is one of 27 national reserves located along the US coastline. The National Estuarine Research Reserve System (NERRS) is a network of federal, state, and local partnerships that emphasize resource stewardship, monitoring of estuarine conditions, management-oriented research, technical information transfer, and environmental education. Reserves such as the ACE Basin, play an important part in preserving our coasts and serve as local links to protect and restore coastal habitats and biodiversity, promote clean coastal waters, and foster sustainable coastal communities compatible with the natural environment.

Web Site:  http://www.dnr.sc.gov/marine/NERR/index.html

Duration:  01/01/1992 to present  (as of 08/28/2012)

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FIU SERC Water Quality Monitoring Network: Florida Bay (S. FL Water Mgmt. District)

Sponsoring Organization:  Florida International University: Southeast Environmental Research Center (SERC)

Description:  The function of the SERC Water Quality Monitoring Network is to address regional water quality concerns that exist outside the boundaries of individual political entities. Funding for the Network has come from many different sources with individual programs being added as funding became available. Field sampling occurs over different time periods due to the nature of the funding. Biscayne Bay, Florida Bay & Whitewater Bay, Ten Thousand Islands, and Marco-Pine Island Sound are sampled monthly, while the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary and the Southwest Florida Shelf are sampled quarterly. The data summary maps are produced on a quarterly basis by integrating the individual projects into one data file for that month sampled. The advantages of having this Network operated from the same facility include site continuity, consistency in analytic methodology, and ease of data integration. The product is a quasi-synoptic "big picture" as to what is happening in the South Florida coastal waters.

Web Site:  http://serc.fiu.edu/wqmnetwork/SFWMD-CD/index.htm

Duration:  01/01/1991 to 09/30/2008  (as of 08/17/2012)

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FIU SERC Water Quality Monitoring Network: Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary (FKNMS)

Sponsoring Organization:  Florida International University: Southeast Environmental Research Center (SERC)

Description:  The Water Quality Monitoring Project is a component of the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary. Water Quality Protection Program established by EPA in 1995 to characterize status and trends in water quality of the Florida Keys. It is operated by Dr. Joseph N. Boyer of the Southeast Environmental Research Center, Florida International University, Miami, FL 33199.

Web Site:  http://serc.fiu.edu/wqmnetwork/FKNMS-CD/index.htm

Duration:  01/01/1995 to present  (as of 03/16/2009)

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FL St. Johns River Water Management District: Surface Water Quality Monitoring

Sponsoring Organization:  Florida Water Management Districts: St. Johns River Water Management District (SJRWMD)

Description:  The water quality group is responsible for sampling surface water quality within the District. The program began in 1983 as the Permanent Monitoring Network and was renamed the Surface Water Quality Monitoring Program (SWQMP) in 1988 to more specifically reflect project activities. Originally the District's only surface water quality monitoring project, the SWQMP is now one of five equivalently sized monitoring programs in the Environmental Sciences Division. The other four programs are the Upper St. Johns River Basin, and the Surface Water Improvement and Management (SWIM) programs of the Lower St. Johns River Basin, Lake Apopka/Upper Ocklawaha River, and the Indian River Lagoon. The Environmental Assessment Section (EAS) of the St. Johns River Water Management District (the District) is responsible for assessing water quality throughout the District’s 18-county service area by sampling ambient water quality and maintaining an ambient water quality monitoring network. The fact pages found on this Web site summarize sample data from the network. In addition to the EAS, other groups of District staff are working on water quality monitoring and restoration, and they have responsibility for specific areas within the District, such as the Indian River Lagoon, Lower St. Johns River, Ocklawaha River, and Lake Apopka; and these data are maintained within separate ambient water quality monitoring networks. However, the EAS’ monitoring efforts are primarily focused on providing a sufficient database for basic water quality assessment and trend analysis throughout the District. These measurements and analyses are intended to help residents and concerned citizens acquire a basic knowledge about water quality for water bodies in which they have an interest.

Web Site:  http://www.sjrwmd.com/programs/surfacewaterquality.html

Duration:  01/01/1983 to present  (as of 03/26/2009)

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Florida DEP CAMA, NE: Guana Tolomato-Matanzas National Estuarine Research Reserve / Aquatic Preserve

Sponsoring Organization:  Florida Department of Environmental Protection: Coastal and Aquatic Managed Areas (CAMA) Northeast

Description:  CAMA has one Atlantic Coastal NERRS site in its program, Guana Tolomato Matanzas NERR, and the Water Quality data are available for this through the NERRS centralized System-wide Monitoring program ( SWAMP). The Guana - Tolomato - Matanzas National Estuarine Research Reserve (GTMNERR) is part of the temperate Carolinian biogeographic province. It represents a relatively undeveloped, coastal estuarine ecosystem in the southeastern U.S. The Tolomato, Guana and Matanzas River estuaries form a system of "bar-bounded" estuaries that extend south from Jacksonville in Duval County to below Marineland in Flagler County behind the barrier island system. The Guana River estuary runs parallel to the Tolomato River estuary on the seaward side, with the two lagoons joining just north of the St. Augustine Inlet. Oceanic exchange occurs through the St. Johns River Inlet, a major navigational channel to the north, and the St. Augustine Inlet to the South. The Matanzas River estuary extends approximately 20 miles south from the St. Augustine Inlet to about eight miles south of the Matanzas Inlet. These tidal inlets form the oceanic exchange for the estuarine ecosystem. The St. Augustine Inlet has been stabilized with north and south jetties and is the major entrance to the Intracoastal Waterway which runs through the Matanzas estuary. Matanzas Inlet is one of the last "natural" inlets on Florida’s east coast. It has remained unimproved, with no dredged channel or armored shoreline, and is suitable only for small water craft. The inlet is characterized by a transitory offshore bar and inner shoal with high tidal currents. The GTMNERR contains two aquatic preserves - the Guana River Marsh Aquatic Preserve and the Pellicer Creek Aquatic Preserve.

Web Site:  http://www.dep.state.fl.us/coastal/sites/gtm/info.htm

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Florida DEP CAMA, NE: Nassau River-St. Johns River Marshes -Fort Clinch State Park Aquatic Preserve

Sponsoring Organization:  Florida Department of Environmental Protection: Coastal and Aquatic Managed Areas (CAMA) Northeast

Description:  Our water quality monitoring program began with a single datasonde in the Ft George River and has grown to currently three instruments at various locations within the Northeast Florida Aquatic Preserve. We are planning on installing an additional site further up the Nassau River this year as well.

Web Site:  http://www.dep.state.fl.us/coastal/sites/nassau/info.htm#Contact

Duration:  01/01/2004 to present  (as of 03/30/2009)

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Florida DEP CAMA, SE: North Fork, St. Lucie Aquatic Preserve

Sponsoring Organization:  Florida Department of Environmental Protection: Coastal and Aquatic Managed Areas (CAMA): Southeast

Description:  The North Fork, St. Lucie River Aquatic Preserve, designated as an aquatic preserve in 1972, consists of a freshwater system upstream and a brackish system near the St. Lucie Estuary. The Preserve is managed by the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, Office of Coastal and Aquatic Managed Areas. It is a major tributary to the St. Lucie Estuary, Indian River Lagoon and the Atlantic Ocean (through St. Lucie Inlet). The river is a freshwater system upstream and a brackish system near the St. Lucie Estuary. The river is tidally influenced to its two main upstream headwaters (Five Mile and Ten Mile Creeks). Recreational uses include fishing, boating, and swimming. Agriculture and residential communities use connecting canals for drainage. Mangroves, leatherfern, sawgrass, tidal marsh and floodplain forest make up the primary plant communities along the riverfront. The aquatic preserve contains fishes, turtles, birds, alligators, and manatees. The adjacent Savannas Preserve State Park contains various natural communities such as pine flatwoods and scrub. Major issues facing the system include stormwater discharge from agricultural and residential areas in the region. Water quality parameters and outbreaks of harmful algae blooms are monitored regularly. The preservation of adjacent lands (state park) and efforts to reduce stormwater input and sedimentation (Central and South Florida Restudy) are addressing most of the needs of the system.

Web Site:  http://www.dep.state.fl.us/coastal/sites/northfork/

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Florida DEP CAMA: Biscayne Bay Aquatic Preserve

Sponsoring Organization:  Florida Department of Environmental Protection: Coastal and Aquatic Managed Areas (CAMA): Southern portion of FL

Description:  Two Aquatic Preserves are named for Biscayne Bay. The first was founded in 1974 as the Biscayne Bay Aquatic Preserve. Its boundaries include the inshore waters and natural waterways connected to Biscayne Bay from the Oleta River in the north to the Card Sound Road bridge between the mainland and northern Key Largo, with Biscayne National Park removed. This leaves two separate areas of state management; the northernmost area is bounded by the headwaters of the Oleta River south to Cape Florida on the east, and just south of Chicken Key and the Deering Estate on the west. The southernmost section begins just south of the Arsenicker Keys on the west and Broad Creek on the east and ends south of Little Card Sound (at the Card Sound Road bridge). The barrier islands of Miami Beach, Fisher Island, Virginia Key, and Key Biscayne form the eastern border of the northern section. The residential developments along the mainland shore and the Miami central business district form the western border. The construction of causeways and the Port of Miami and other dredged islands have subdivided the northern preserve into eight basins. Dredge and fill projects have altered the northern bay with channels too deep for seagrass growth. Despite the development that has taken place in the northern bay there still are areas with abundant seagrass beds and mangrove fringe forests in certain areas. State, county, and city parks provide a variety of access points and possible recreational activities within Biscayne Bay. Swimming, kayak rentals, historic tours, and picnicking are a few of the activities that visitors and residents can enjoy at Oleta River State Park, the Barnacle Historic State Park, and Bill Baggs Cape Florida State Park in the northern part of the Aquatic Preserve. The southern part of the preserve consists of Card Sound and Little Card Sound, located between the southeast mainland of Florida and the northern end of Key Largo, in Miami-Dade and Monroe counties. This

Web Site:  http://www.dep.state.fl.us/coastal/sites/biscayne/

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Florida DEP CAMA: Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary Water Quality Monitoring Program

Sponsoring Organization:  Florida Department of Environmental Protection: Coastal and Aquatic Managed Areas (CAMA): Southern portion of FL

Description:  For well over 30 years, Key Largo National Marine Sanctuary (NMS) and Looe Key NMS have provided protection to exemplary portions of Florida's Reef Tract. However, public concern about increasing threats to each of the habitats that comprise this sub-tropical ecosystem resulted in the establishment of the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary (FKNMS) in 1990. Additionally, as part of the state of Florida/s effort to protect the waters in the Keys, the Coupon Bight Aquatic Preserve and Lignumvitae Key Aquatic Preserve were created. Few marine environments in the U.S. compare to the Florida Keys in terms of natural beauty and natural resources. The most extensive living coral reef in the United States is adjacent to the 126 mile island chain of the Florida Keys. The Keys are located on the southern tip of the Florida peninsula, beginning 60 miles south of Miami and ending just 90 miles north of Cuba. These coral reefs are intimately linked to a marine ecosystem that supports one of the most unique and diverse assemblages of plants and animals in North America. The 2,900 square nautical mile FKNMS surrounds the entire archipelago of the Florida Keys and includes the productive waters of Florida Bay, the Gulf of Mexico and the Atlantic Ocean. Cultural resources are also contained within the sanctuary. The proximity of coral reefs to centuries old shipping routes has resulted in a high concentration of shipwrecks and an abundance of artifacts. This complex marine ecosystem also supports tourism and commercial fishing, the economic foundation of the Florida Keys. In the last 20 years the tourism industry has grown to over four million domestic and foreign visitors who drive, fly or cruise each year to the most accessible tropical paradise in the Caribbean Basin. The Keys support 82,000 full-time residents. Tourists and semi-permanent residents increase this population by 75% during "season" (November to April). This ecosystem's extensive nursery, feeding and br

Web Site:  http://www.dep.state.fl.us/coastal/sites/keys/

Duration:  01/01/1995 to present  (as of 03/19/2009)

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Florida DEP Integrated Water Resource Monitoring Network

Sponsoring Organization:  Florida Department of Environmental Protection: Northeast District

Description:  This effort, the Integrated Water Resource Monitoring Network (IWRM) Program, is a multi-level or “tiered” monitoring program designed to answer questions about Florida’s water quality at differing scales. The program is supported by several DEP water quality monitoring groups in Tallahassee and in regional (district) offices. In general, Tier I addresses statewide and regional (within Florida) questions, Tier II focuses on basin-specific to stream-segment-specific questions, while Tier III answers site-specific questions. Tier I monitoring is comprised of two monitoring efforts, status monitoring, and trend monitoring, which are both designed to answer state-wide to regional questions. Tier II monitoring includes basin assessments and monitoring required for TMDL (total maximum daily load) development . This monitoring is more localized in nature than that occurring under Tier I monitoring, yet may encompass a broader area then that employed in Tier III. Tier III includes all monitoring tied to regulatory permits issued by DEP and is associated with evaluating the effectiveness of point source discharge reductions, best management practices or TMDLs. The program addresses both surface and ground waters of the state.

Web Site:  http://www.dep.state.fl.us/water/monitoring/index.htm

Duration:  01/01/1996 to present  (as of 03/16/2009)

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Florida DEP Integrated Water Resource Monitoring Network: Duval Tributary Watch

Sponsoring Organization:  Florida Department of Environmental Protection: Northeast District

Description:  The Florida Department of Environmental Protection's Northeast District partners with the Duval County Health Department and City of Jacksonville's Regulatory and Environmental Services Department to provide quarterly water quality reports on tributaries of the St. Johns River in Duval County. Each agency is responsible for different aspects of environmental and public health protection. Florida Department of Environmental Protection Responsible for protecting the quality of Florida’s water resources through state water quality standards and monitoring. The agency conducts permitting and compliance and enforcement programs for Florida’s domestic and industrial wastewater facilities, and its drinking water systems. Duval County Health Department Environmental Health services are administered by the Duval County Health Department and aim to prevent or reduce potential health risks in daily surroundings. Environmental Resource Management The City of Jacksonville's RESD collects surface water quality data in Duval County. RESD closely coordinates all of its monitoring activities with other agencies and regularly provides data to state, regional and local agencies charged with permitting activities that may impact surface water quality.

Web Site:  http://www.dep.state.fl.us/northeast/trib/trib_watch.htm#Water%20Quality%20Monitoring%20Programs

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Florida DEP Integrated Water Resource Monitoring Network: St. Johns River

Sponsoring Organization:  Florida Department of Environmental Protection: Northeast District

Description:  The Department of Environmental Protection's (DEP) River at a Glance report provides the public with information on water quality in the St. Johns River. Since April of 1997, DEP's Northeast District has sampled the River in Duval County and later expanded this effort to include stations in Clay and Putnam counties. Since environmental factors can change quickly, scientists dubbed the survey "River at a Glance" to emphasize that the sample results represent a monthly snapshot of the St. Johns River. River at a Glance is intended to monitor water quality and draw conclusions on the influence of environmental factors. If water quality drops below the safe mark for swimming or fishing activities, the Department of Health would issue appropriate warnings.

Web Site:  http://www.dep.state.fl.us/northeast/stjohns/default.htm

Duration:  01/01/1997 to present  (as of 03/16/2009)

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Florida: Jacksonville: Surface Water Quality: Timucuan Preserve (NPS)

Sponsoring Organization:  Florida: City of Jacksonville

Description:  The Water Quality Section maintains three surface water quality monitoring programs. This entry focuses on the NPS Partnership in the Timucuan Preserve. For details about all 3 programs contact the Program Contact listed below. 1. Timucuan Preserve Program 2. Tributary Program 3. River Run Program

Web Site:  http://www.coj.net/Departments/Environmental+and+Compliance/Environmental+Quality/Surface+Water+Quality/default.htm

Duration:  01/01/1997 to present  (as of 03/26/2009)

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GCE LTER Climate Monitoring

Sponsoring Organization:  Georgia Coastal Ecosystems Long Term Ecological Research (GCE LTER)

Description:  Four meteorological stations, operated and maintained by various institutions affiliated with the GCE LTER program, are used to characterize the weather and climate over a large spatial scale within the GCE LTER domain. Three of these stations are located on Sapelo Island at Marsh Landing, Flume Dock and the Marine Institute. The Marine Institute maintains a National Weather Service station for daily min/max temperatures and precipitation, and data exist back to 1957. The Marsh Landing and Flume Dock stations measure various semi-hourly hydrological and quarter-hourly meteorological parameters, and data exist back to 1986. Campbell Scientific Instruments equipment belonging to the SINERR program and made available for the GCE-LTER project was upgraded to LTER Level 2 climate standards in February 2002, and installed at Marsh Landing in July 2002. This station now serves as our primary LTER meteorological station for inter-comparison studies and ClimDB. A fourth station is located on Hudson Creek in Meridian and is maintained by USGS and GCE personnel. This station has been operational since March 2001 and provisional data on hydrological and meteorological parameters are acquired semi-hourly and hourly respectively.

Web Site:  http://gce-lter.marsci.uga.edu/public/research/mon/climate.htm

Duration:  05/01/2000 to present  (as of 08/14/2012)

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GCE LTER Continuous Salinity, Temperature and Water Level Monitoring

Sponsoring Organization:  Georgia Coastal Ecosystems Long Term Ecological Research (GCE LTER)

Description:  The objective of the GCE Continuous Salinity, Temperature and Water Level Monitoring program is to document spatial and temporal variability of salinity and its relationship to water level and river discharge. Long-term measurements of conductivity, temperature and sub-surface pressure are collected at 30 minute intervals at 8 sites in the GCE-LTER domain. These monitoring sites were chosen to span the salinity gradient as well as to take advantage of existing physical structures (e.g. docks or pilings) for mounting instruments. The long-term moorings are located in transect regions used for quarterly oceanographic surveys and near to GCE-LTER marsh study sites.

Web Site:  http://gce-lter.marsci.uga.edu/public/research/mon/sounds_creeks.htm

Duration:  05/01/2000 to present  (as of 10/25/2012)

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GCE LTER Water Quality Monitoring

Sponsoring Organization:  Georgia Coastal Ecosystems Long Term Ecological Research (GCE LTER)

Description:  The GCE LTER project monitors nutrient chemistry, chlorophyll concentrations, and vertical profiles of salinity, temperature and photosynthetically-available radiation monthly to document environmental gradients across the GCE landscape.

Web Site:  http://gce-lter.marsci.uga.edu/public/research/research.htm

Duration:  05/01/2000 to present  (as of 08/14/2012)

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Georgia DNR Nutrient Monitoring in Coastal Rivers, Sounds and Estuaries

Sponsoring Organization:  Georgia Department of Natural Resources: Georgia Coastal Resources Division

Description:  Nutrient monitoring is an effort funded by the State of Georgia to assess the nutrient loads in our sounds and estuaries. Nutrient monitoring is a continuous monitoring program designed to establish trends for Nitrate nitrogen, Nitrite nitrogen, Ammonia nitrogen, Total dissolved phosphorus, Ortho phosphate, and Silicate. Sample collection for nutrients occurs monthly at 89 stations on the coast. River nutrient monitoring is funded by the State Legislature annually. Monthly monitoring occurs year-round on the Ogeechee, Altamaha, and St. Marys Rivers. On each of these rivers, six (6) sample sites have been chosen using the collective knowledge of resource managers, commercial fishermen, and scientists. Water samples from each of these sites are collected by CRD and analyzed by University of Georgia for a suite of nutrients including Nitrates, Nitrites, Ammonia, Total Dissolved Phosphorus, Orthophosphates, and Silicates.

Web Site:  http://www.coastalgadnr.org/ha/wq/nm

Duration:  03/01/2000 to present  (as of 06/30/2014)

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Georgia DNR Shellfish Water Quality

Sponsoring Organization:  Georgia Department of Natural Resources: Georgia Coastal Resources Division

Description:  Coastal Resources Division administers this program under the guidance of the United States Food and Drug Administrations (FDA) National Shellfish Sanitation Program (NSSP) standards. The National Shellfish Sanitation Program's (NSSP) Manual of Operations (Part 1, Section C-3,a) requires that states show that shellfish harvest areas are "not subject to contamination from human and/or animal fecal matter in amounts that in the judgment of the SSCA [State Shellfish Control Authority] may present an actual or potential hazard to public health."

Web Site:  http://coastalgadnr.org/fb/shell

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Guana Tolomato Matanzas NERR Monitoring Program

Sponsoring Organization:  NOAA National Estuarine Research Reserve System (NERRS)

Description:  The Guana Tolomato Matanzas National Estuarine Research Reserve encompasses approximately 55,000 acres of salt marsh and mangrove tidal wetlands, oyster bars, estuarine lagoons, upland habitat and offshore seas in Northeast Florida. It contains the northern most extent of mangrove habitat on the east coast of the United States. The coastal waters of the GTM Reserve are important calving grounds for the endangered Right Whale. Manatees, Wood Storks, Roseate Spoonbills, Bald Eagles and Peregrine Falcons find refuge in the reserve.

Web Site:  http://www.gtmnerr.org/

Duration:  01/01/1999 to present  (as of 08/20/2012)

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Mercury Deposition Network

Sponsoring Organization:  National Atmospheric Deposition Program

Description:  The MDN is the only network providing a long term record of total mercury (Hg) concentration and deposition in precipitation in the United States and Canada.

Duration:  01/01/1996 to present  (as of 08/29/2012)

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National Park Service: Inventory & Monitoring Vital Signs Monitoring: Marine Water Quality Program

Sponsoring Organization:  National Park Service: Southeast Coast Network (SECN)

Description:  Estuaries are semi-enclosed coastal bodies of water that have free connection with the open sea and within which sea water mixes with fresh water. The key feature of an estuary is that it is an interface between sea water and fresh water and there is an influence of the ocean tide creating a dynamic relationship between the two waters. Estuaries contain critical habitat for a variety of fish, and wildlife species. They serve as nursery habitats for fish, crustaceans, and shellfish and foraging habitat for birds and mammals while providing a multitude of recreational opportunities including boating, fishing, and bird watching. These are fragile ecosystems vulnerable to impacts caused by development and use. Severe impacts including alterations to hydrodynamic processes, exposure to levels of chemical contaminants that cause mortality, altered growth, and reduced reproduction and exposure to more frequent and severe hypoxia can be seen in estuarine habitats from urban and industrial development (Lerberg et al. 2000). In addition, macrobenthic communities in impacted areas are characterized by low diversity, low numbers of rare and pollution sensitive species, and low macrobenthic abundances (Lerberg et al. 2000). In areas with increased impervious cover, stormwater runoff is flashy and greater then natural amounts of fresh and polluted waters are released into estuaries (Holland et al. 2004). The SECN monitoring design will include fixed site and probability-based sampling, described below.

Web Site:  http://science.nature.nps.gov/im/monitor/index.cfm

Duration:  01/01/2006 to present  (as of 03/23/2009)

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National Trends Network

Sponsoring Organization:  National Atmospheric Deposition Program

Description:  The NTN is the only network providing a long-term record of precipitation chemistry across the United States. Sites predominantly are located away from urban areas and point sources of pollution. Each site has a precipitation chemistry collector and gage. The automated collector ensures that the sample is exposed only during precipitation (wet-only-sampling). Site operators follow standard operational procedures to help ensure NTN data comparability and representativeness. They collect samples weekly on Tuesday morning, using only containers cleaned at the Central Analytical Laboratory (CAL) at the Illinois State Water Survey (ISWS). They weigh the collection bucket to determine sample volume and transfer the sample from the collection bucket to a shipping bottle. All samples are sent to the CAL for analysis, and data entry, verification, and screening.

Web Site:  http://nadp.sws.uiuc.edu/ntn/

Duration:  01/01/1978 to present  (as of 08/29/2012)

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NCCOS: Georgia Coastal Analysis Partnership

Sponsoring Organization:  NOAA Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, Coastal Environmental Health and Biomolecular Research

Description:  GCAP was a joint data-sharing initiative undertaken by scientists from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Georgia Department of Natural Resources (GA DNR), and the Skidaway Institute of Oceanography (SkIO) to coordinate results of ongoing federal and state monitoring programs along the coast of Georgia in an effort to support common research and coastal-management goals. The website is still viable and data are accessible.

Web Site:  http://www.chbr.noaa.gov/gcap/

Duration:  07/01/2001 to 09/01/2005  (as of 03/16/2009)

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NCCOS: National Benthic Inventory Program

Sponsoring Organization:  NOAA Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, Coastal Environmental Health and Biomolecular Research

Description:  The NBI consists of a dynamic quantitative database on benthic species distributions and a corresponding taxonomic voucher collection of preserved benthic specimens obtained from studies conducted by NOAA and partnering institutions in estuarine and other coastal areas around the country. The quantitative database provides information on benthic species abundances by species and location, thus providing a basis for addressing important management and research questions, such as "what are the incidence and patterns of occurrence of a particular species of interest," or "what are the overall composition and diversity of species assemblages within any particular region of interest. Water Quality data are included.

Web Site:  http://www.nbi.noaa.gov/default.aspx

Duration:  01/01/1991 to present  (as of 03/16/2009)

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North Carolina DENR: DWQ Ambient Monitoring System

Sponsoring Organization:  North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resources: Division of Water Quality

Description:  The AMS consists of a network of stations established to provide site-specific, long-term water quality information on significant rivers, streams, and estuaries throughout the state. The program has been active for over thirty years. Stations are visited at least monthly for the collection of a variety of physical, chemical, and bacterial pathogen samples and measurements. Details of the program design and implementation can be found in the Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP), SOP, and other links on the left of this page. General information on objectives, indicators measured, and data availability is provided below.

Web Site:  http://h2o.enr.state.nc.us/esb/ams.html

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North Carolina DENR: Recreational Water Quality and Shellfish Sanitation Monitoring

Sponsoring Organization:  North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resources: Division of Environmental Health

Description:  The program monitors 240 swimming sites that are located on ocean beaches, sounds and coastal rivers. All ocean beaches and high-use sound-side beaches are tested weekly from April through September; lower-use beaches are tested twice a month. All sites are tested twice a month in October and monthly from November through March.

Web Site:  http://www.deh.enr.state.nc.us/shellfish/index.htm

Duration:  01/01/1997 to present  (as of 03/03/2009)

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North Carolina NERR Monitoring Program

Sponsoring Organization:  NOAA National Estuarine Research Reserve System (NERRS)

Description:  North Carolina's estuarine system is the third largest in the country, encompassing more the two million acres. This system is of prime economic importance to the coastal area -- 90 percent of the commercial seafood species caught in the state spends at least part of their lives in an estuary. The North Carolina National Estuarine Research Reserve was established to preserve these fragile natural areas and the variety of life they support. The state is representative of two major biogeographic regions located north (Virginian) and south (Carolinian) of Cape Hatteras. Therefore, NOAA and the state of North Carolina created a multi-component reserve with the following sites: Currituck Banks (960 acres near Corolla), Rachel Carson (2,625 acres near Beaufort), Masonboro Island (5,097 acres near Wrightsville Beach) and Zeke’s Island (1,165 acres near Kure Beach).

Web Site:  http://www.nccoastalreserve.net/

Duration:  01/01/1995 to present  (as of 08/20/2012)

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North Inlet Winyah Bay Monitoring Program

Sponsoring Organization:  NOAA National Estuarine Research Reserve System (NERRS)

Description:  The North Inlet Winyah Bay reserve features the salt marshes and ocean dominated tidal creeks of the North Inlet Estuary plus the brackish waters and marshes of the adjacent Winyah Bay Estuary. North Inlet is a relatively pristine system in which water and habitat quality are much higher than those in Winyah Bay. As the estuary with the third largest watershed on the east coast,Winyah Bay has been greatly influenced by agriculture, industry and other human activities. More than 90 percent of North Inlet's watershed is in its natural forested state The reserve is home to many threatened and endangered species, including sea turtles, sturgeons, least terns and wood storks.

Web Site:  http://www.northinlet.sc.edu/

Duration:  01/01/1972 to present  (as of 08/20/2012)

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NWS Cooperative Observer Program

Sponsoring Organization:  NOAA National Weather Service

Description:  The National Weather Service (NWS) Cooperative Observer Program (COOP) is truly the Nation's weather and climate observing network of, by and for the people. More than 11,000 volunteers take observations on farms, in urban and suburban areas, National Parks, seashores, and mountaintops. The data are truly representative of where people live, work and play. COOP observational data supports the NWS climate program and field operations. The program responsibilities include: * Selecting data sites * Recruiting, appointing and training of observers * Installing and maintaining equipment * Keeping station documentation observer payroll * Collecting data and its delivering it to users * Maintaining data quality control * Managing fiscal and human resources required to accomplish program objectives

Web Site:  http://www.weather.gov/om/coop/

Duration:  01/01/1890 to present  (as of 08/14/2012)

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Sapelo Island NERR Monitoring Program

Sponsoring Organization:  NOAA National Estuarine Research Reserve System (NERRS)

Description:  The Sapelo Island National Estuarine Research Reserve (SINERR), located on the western perimeter of Sapelo, is dedicated to research, education, stewardship, and sound management of coastal resources in Georgia. Specifically, we focus on the natural, cultural, and historical resources of Sapelo Island and the Duplin River estuary. SINERR, one of 27 reserves around the country, is administered by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and managed by Georgia Department of Natural Resources, Wildlife Resources Division. SINERR participates in the NERR System-wide Monitoring Program, which measures changes in estuarine water quality to track the health of our nation's National Estuarine Research Reserves and coastal areas. It provides valuable long-term data on water quality and weather at high frequency time intervals to researchers, natural resource managers, and other coastal decision makers.

Web Site:  http://www.sapelonerr.org/

Duration:  01/01/1987 to present  (as of 01/05/2017)

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South Carolina Ambient Surface Physical and Chemical Water Monitoring Network

Sponsoring Organization:  South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control

Description:  In an effort to evaluate the State's water quality, the SCDHEC collects data from a Statewide network of primary and secondary ambient monitoring stations and flexible, rotating watershed monitoring stations. The ambient monitoring network (PDF-2.02 MB) is directed toward determining long-term water quality trends, assessing attainment of water quality standards (R.61-68), identifying locations in need of additional attention, and providing background data for planning and evaluating stream classifications (R.61-69) and standards (R.61-68). For more information see the State of South Carolina Monitoring Strategy (PDF-4.86MB), Watershed Management Program and Common Water Quality Indicators (PDF-21.76 KB). Ambient monitoring data are also used in the process of formulating permit limits for wastewater discharges with the goal of maintaining State and Federal water quality standards and criteria in the receiving streams in accordance with the goals of the Clean Water Act. These standa The South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control is beginning an evaluation of our freshwater water quality ambient monitoring program. For more than twenty-five years, DHEC has monitored the quality of our surface waters. Presently we use fecal coliform as the bacteria indicator of recreational water quality, and all waters of the state must meet swimming standards. Changes in science and technology now enable us to consider the use of other indicators to ensure that we are sufficiently protecting the citizens of South Carolina. Sources of fecal contamination include wildlife, agricultural waste, pet waste, leaky septic systems, and poorly designed or maintained sanitary sewers and wastewater treatment plants. Despite their name, fecal coliforms include non-fecal bacteria. A change in indicator is being considered, to reflect more meaningful and realistic protection for surface freshwaters of the state. This change will affect ambient water quality monitoring

Web Site:  http://www.scdhec.net/environment/water/surface.htm

Duration:  01/01/1984 to present  (as of 03/03/2009)

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South Carolina DHEC Beach Monitoring Program

Sponsoring Organization:  South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control

Description:  SC DHEC routinely collects water samples at over 100 locations on South Carolina's beaches. If high numbers of bacteria are found, an advisory is issued for that portion of the beach. An advisory means that DHEC advises you to NOT swim in certain areas. This is especially true for young children and those with compromised immune systems. Advisories do not mean that the beach is closed. Wading, fishing, and shell collecting do not pose a risk. Advisories may be issued due to high bacteria counts or rainfall. Advisories are lifted when sample results fall below the limit of 104/100mL. Check the local newspaper and television news stations. Look for advisory signs when you go to the beach.

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South Carolina DHEC Shellfish Sanitation Program

Sponsoring Organization:  South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control

Description:  The shellfish-monitoring program provides the database that is used in conducting a comprehensive evaluation of each shellfish growing area. Evaluations of growing areas, which meet National Shellfish Sanitation Program requirements are conducted annually. Routine bacteriological monitoring and subsequent laboratory analyses of water quality from approximately 465 strategically located sample sites are conducted monthly.

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South Carolina Estuarine and Coastal Assessment Program (SCECAP)

Sponsoring Organization:  South Carolina Department of Natural Resources: Marine Division

Description:  The South Carolina Estuarine and Coastal Assessment Program (SCECAP).integrates multiple measures of water quality, sediment quality and biological condition to assess overall ecological condition, and it expands historical monitoring activities that have primarily focused on open water habitats (e.g. tidal rivers, sounds) to include tidal creeks, which represent important nursery habitat for most of the state’s economically valuable species. Many tidal creeks are the first point of entry for nonpoint source runoff from upland areas, providing an early indication of anthropogenic stresses on the environment. The SCECAP monitoring design uses a probability-based approach developed by the USEPA National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory in Corvallis, OR. It also incorporates measurements and samples required for the USEPA National Coastal Assessment Program, which was initiated in South Carolina in 2000. This USEPA program provides an opportunity to integrate state monitoring goals with national monitoring objectives, while allowing an expansion of monitoring activities that would otherwise not be feasible through state funding alone. Other research projects and partners have also been incorporated into SCECAP, providing more funding and opportunities for collaboration. Cooperators include the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), NOAA/NOS-Charleston Lab, the College of Charleston, the Harmful Algal Bloom Program and several coastal counties that provided funding for water quality monitoring instrumentation.

Web Site:  http://www.dnr.sc.gov/marine/scecap/index.htm

Duration:  01/01/1999 to present  (as of 02/27/2009)

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South Carolina Estuarine and Coastal Assessment Program (SCECAP)

Sponsoring Organization:  South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control

Description:  The South Carolina Estuarine and Coastal Assessment Program (SCECAP).integrates multiple measures of water quality, sediment quality and biological condition to assess overall ecological condition, and it expands historical monitoring activities that have primarily focused on open water habitats (e.g. tidal rivers, sounds) to include tidal creeks, which represent important nursery habitat for most of the state’s economically valuable species. Many tidal creeks are the first point of entry for nonpoint source runoff from upland areas, providing an early indication of anthropogenic stresses on the environment. The SCECAP monitoring design uses a probability-based approach developed by the USEPA National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory in Corvallis, OR. It also incorporates measurements and samples required for the USEPA National Coastal Assessment Program, which was initiated in South Carolina in 2000. This USEPA program provides an opportunity to integrate state monitoring goals with national monitoring objectives, while allowing an expansion of monitoring activities that would otherwise not be feasible through state funding alone. Other research projects and partners have also been incorporated into SCECAP, providing more funding and opportunities for collaboration. Cooperators include the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), NOAA/NOS-Charleston Lab, the College of Charleston, the Harmful Algal Bloom Program and several coastal counties that provided funding for water quality monitoring instrumentation.

Web Site:  http://www.dnr.sc.gov/marine/scecap/index.htm

Duration:  01/01/1999 to present  (as of 03/12/2009)

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South Florida Water Management District Environmental Monitoring

Sponsoring Organization:  South Florida Water Management District

Description:  Improving water quality is one of the core components in the South Florida Water Management District's mission. A significant amount of data is collected and analyzed to assess our region's water quality. Water quality monitoring systems track ecosystem status and trends and the performance of District projects, including information needed to meet legal and regulatory requirements. Environmental information is essential to effective water resource management and restoration. Real-time data combined with historical information about weather, rainfall and changes in vegetation or land-use are used to help managers make water resource decisions that are based on the soundest science. The District's environmental monitoring program supports restoration projects throughout the central and south Florida region, including the Everglades, Kissimmee River, Lake Okeechobee, Big Cypress Basin, water conservation areas and stormwater treatment areas.

Web Site:  https://www.sfwmd.gov/science-data/environmental-monitoring

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University of Georgia's MAREX Altamaha River Monitoring Program

Sponsoring Organization:  University of Georgia Marine Extension Service: MAREX Marine Advisory Services

Description:  The Altamaha River was the third river in the series to be investigated. This complex system was studied for three years. Physical, chemical and biological monitoring began in April 2002 and continued through March 2003 for Phase I. Five sampling locations were chosen on the Altamaha River from the mouth between Egg and Wolf Islands , to Two-Way Fish Camp Marina. Stage II of the Altamaha River project began in June 2003 and was designed to assess the exchange of salt and fresh water between the river and its associated sound systems. Two stations were carried over from year one and three new stations were added along the Mackay River . Monitoring for Phase II continued through May 2004. Altamaha River Phase III efforts began in August 2004. A Troll 9000® Multi-parameter instrument (Intermountain Environmental, Inc.) was trawled slowly behind the research vessel recording pH, temperature, salinity, pressure, turbidity, and dissolved oxygen in 2-minute intervals.

Web Site:  http://www.marex.uga.edu/advisory/WaterQuality.html

Duration:  04/01/2002 to 07/01/2005  (as of 07/29/2011)

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University of Georgia's MAREX Ogeechee River Monitoring Program

Sponsoring Organization:  University of Georgia Marine Extension Service: MAREX Marine Advisory Services

Description:  Our monitoring efforts shifted to the Ogeechee River in February 2001. We selected five stations on this river. All five stations were monitored once monthly at low tide. Additionally, stations 1, 3, and 5 were monitored every other month at high tide. A continuous monitoring device was placed in the Ogeechee River at station 3. Several current meters (one each at stations 1, 3, and 5) were deployed in the Ogeechee River for a period of two months. The Marine Extension Service collaborated with the Skidaway Institute on this effort and several other current meters were deployed in the Little Ogeechee River during the same time. This information was also provided to Dr. Chen for model development.

Web Site:  http://fvcom.smast.umassd.edu/research_projects/Ogeechee/index.html

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University of Georgia's MAREX Satilla River Monitoring Program

Sponsoring Organization:  University of Georgia Marine Extension Service: MAREX Marine Advisory Services

Description:  In February 2000, we began monitoring water quality on the Satilla River. Using field instruments, we measured dissolved oxygen, chlorophyll, salinity, temperature, pH and turbidity at seven stations. In addition, we brought water samples to our lab where we tested for total and fecal coliform bacteria, carbon and nitrogen, biological oxygen demand, total suspended solids, ATP, and nutrients, such as ammonia, nitrate+nitrite, and phosphorous. We recorded these parameters at low tide and at high tide each month and provided the data to Dr. Changsheng Chen, now with the University of Massachusetts at Dartmouth , who created a predictive computer model of the river. This tool will be valuable in projecting future impacts that population growth and other factors will have on the river.

Web Site:  http://fvcom.smast.umassd.edu/research_projects/Satilla/index.html

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University of NC Ferrymon

Sponsoring Organization:  University of North Carolina FerryMon

Description:  FerryMon stands for "Ferry Monitoring" program. We use the NC ferry transportation system to monitor and keep a "watch" on water quality. We use the NC ferry transportation system to monitor and keep a "watch" on water quality. Some ferries are set up to collect surface water at different times during the ferry's journey. The ferry stores the water until it can be taken back to the lab to be studied. The ferry also has a set of sensors that measure salinity, temperature, chlorophyll a , and other parameters. This information is sent from the ferry to the lab by cell phone line. The information is then converted to graphs that are sent to the Department of Environment and Natural Resources, the US Environmental Protection Agency, the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration, local water quality and fisheries agencies, researchers and schools for teaching purposes.

Web Site:  http://www.unc.edu/ims/paerllab/research/ferrymon/index.html

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USGS Water Resources of the United States: Ground Water

Sponsoring Organization:  U.S. Geological Survey

Description:  The USGS National Water Information System (NWIS) contains extensive water data for the Nation. Public access to many of these data is provided via NWISWeb. The Ground-Water database consists of more than 850,000 records of wells, springs, test holes, tunnels,drains, and excavations in the United States. Available site descriptive information includes well location information such as latitude and longitude, well depth, and aquifer. The USGS annually monitors ground-water levels in thousands of wells in the United States. Ground-water level data are collected and stored as either discrete field-water-level measurements or as continuous time-series data from automated recorders. Data from some of the continuous record stations are relayed to USGS offices nationwide through telephone lines or by satellite transmissions providing access to realtime ground-water data. Once a complete day of readings are received from a site, daily summary data are generated and made available online. Annually, the USGS finalizes and publishes the daily data in a series of water-data reports.

Web Site:  http://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis/gw

Duration:  03/03/1879 to present  (as of 06/04/2008)

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USGS Water Resources of the United States: Surface Water

Sponsoring Organization:  U.S. Geological Survey

Description:  Nationally, USGS surface-water data includes more than 850,000 station years of time-series data that describe stream levels, streamflow (discharge), reservoir and lake levels, surface-water quality, and rainfall. The data are collected by automatic recorders and manual measurements at field installations across the Nation. Data are collected by field personnel or relayed through telephones or satellites to offices where it is stored and processed. The data relayed through the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) system are processed automatically in near real time, and in many cases, real-time data are available online within minutes. Once a complete day of readings are received from a site, daily summary data are generated and stored in the data base. Recent provisional daily data are updated on the web once a day when the computation is completed. Annually, the USGS finalizes and publishes the daily data in a series of water-data reports. Daily streamflow data and peak data are updated annually following publication of the reports.

Web Site:  http://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis/sw

Duration:  03/03/1879 to present  (as of 06/04/2008)

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USGS Water Resources of the United States: Water Quality

Sponsoring Organization:  U.S. Geological Survey

Description:  The U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) National Water Information System (NWIS) is a comprehensive and distributed application that supports the acquisition, processing, and long-term storage of water data. NWISWeb serves as the publicly available portal to a geographically seamless set of much of the water data maintained within NWIS. The USGS collects and analyzes chemical, physical, and biological properties of water, sediment and tissue samples from across the Nation. The NWISWeb discrete sample data base is a compilation of over 4.4 million historical water quality analyses in the USGS district data bases through September 2005. The discrete sample data is a large and complex set of data that has been collected by a variety of projects ranging from national programs to studies in small watersheds. Users should review the help notes and particularly the data retrieval precautions before beginning any retrieval or analysis of data from this data set. Additions of more current data, modifications to ancillary information, and enhanced retrieval options to help users find and appropriately use the data they need are planned for a future release of NWISWeb. At selected surface-water and ground-water sites, the USGS maintains instruments that continuously record physical and chemical characteristics of the water including pH, specific conductance, temperature, dissolved oxygen, and percent dissolved-oxygen saturation. Supporting data such as air temperature and barometric pressure are also available at some sites. At sites where this information is transmitted automatically, data are available from the real-time data system. Once a complete day of readings are received from a site, daily summary data are generated and made available online. Annually, the USGS finalizes and publishes the daily data in a series of water-data reports.

Web Site:  http://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis/qw

Duration:  03/03/1879 to present  (as of 02/22/2013)

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